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Nicolas King: On Another Note

| May 29, 2017

Nicolas King

On Another Note

May 11, 2017

Reviewed by Gianluca Russo for Cabaret Scenes

Nicolas King has come a long way since his start on Broadway in 2000. The little boy who won us over in shows like Beauty and the Beast and A Thousand Clowns, now in his twenties, is clenching onto our hearts with his new CD, On Another Note.

Beginning with “Skylark” (Hoagy Carmichael/Johnny Mercer), King takes us on a journey of love, discovery, passion, and heartbreak. With his soothing voice and kindhearted tone, each song is sweet to the ears and calming to the mind.

Perfect for more relaxed settings, highlights of the CD include “Will She Like Me?” (“Will He Like Me?”) (Sheldon Harnick/Jerry Bock), a playful song, and “Where Can I Go Without You” (Peggy Lee/Victor Young), one of the collection’s more emotional highpoints.

With just Mike Renzi on piano, On Another Note is stripped of all bells and whistles and left with a raw, honest and relatable story for all. Each song flows quite perfectly into the next, and truly transports the listener to a place of serenity and relaxation. At times, it all begins to sound a little too familiar, almost seeming as though it is one long track and not eleven separate ones (two of which contain two-song medleys). While the raw sound is appreciated, a larger and more profound emotional arc could have pushed On Another Note to the next level.

All in all, Nicolas King has shown us once again the immense talent with which he has been gifted. On Another Note is not just another album: it is a heartfelt compilation of some of the cabaret world’s greatest hits, perfect for all wanting a serene night of classic jazz.

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Category: Music, Music Reviews, New York City, New York City Music Reviews, Regional

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